Posts tagged ‘John Bernardi’

A Whole Grain Krispy Kreme Donut?

I wanted to share this awesome article on Whole Grains by John M. Berardi. It is really sad the marketing that goes behind keeping America unhealthy. I cannot tell you how many time I have heard, “I eat whole grains, I have switched to cooking with whole wheat pasta”. Really, people truly believe they are eating healthier by switching to whole wheate pasta! A few highlights as mentioned in the article below I feel are very important to remember. (1) What are Unprocessed Whole Grains, do you research and know what these are! (2) Eating Whole Grains does not give you a lisence to over eat on these carbohydrates (3) Please do not fall for the marketing messages of these mega food companies, I cannot think of a better analogy than a Whole Grain Krispy Kreme donut or Whole Grain Frosted Flakes. (4) Just because these carbs are “safe”, doesn’t mean that you can eat them anytime.

Enjoy the artile, it’s a good one!

The Safe Carbs – Whole Grains
by John M Berardi, March 11th, 2009.

The Whole Grain Survey
A few weeks back I gave a nutrition workshop and during the event I asked the attendees to come up with a list of unprocessed, whole grain carbohydrates they consume on a regular basis. Now, at this point, I’d like you to do the same.

Get out a piece of paper, take a minute, and write down 6 unprocessed whole grain carbs that you have in your house right now and eat on a regular basis. Seriously, go ahead. Put ‘em down. And be specific.

Unprocessed, Whole Grain Food #1-

Unprocessed, Whole Grain Food #2 –

Unprocessed, Whole Grain Food #3 –

Unprocessed, Whole Grain Food #4 –

Unprocessed, Whole Grain Food #5 –

Unprocessed, Whole Grain Food #6 –

Ok now, let’s talk whole grains.

What’s A Whole Grain?
Interestingly, during the workshop discussed above, I learned something very important. And the lesson was this. Most people have no idea what experts are talking about when they recommend unprocessed, whole grain carb sources.

This was particularly eye-opening for me because I regularly encourage folks to do just that. In seminars. In articles. And in a few spots in Precision Nutrition V3.

This is because whole grain, unprocessed carbs offer the following benefits:

They’re high in fiber, helping us maintain a healthy GI tract
They’re slow to digest, helping us control blood sugar
They’re loaded with vitamins and minerals, improving our nutrient density
They’re satisfying, helping us control appetite
As a result of these benefits above, whole grain, unprocessed carbohydrate sources tend to be much better handled, even by those with naturally poor carbohydrate tolerance, than the more heavily processed starchy carbohydrate sources like breads, pastas, rices, crackers, and cereals.

Comfort Food For Some – Unhealthy For Most
That’s right, even if you don’t think you can “handle carbs”, you can probably eat a moderate amount of whole grain, unprocessed carbs. And not only can you “get away” with it. You’d probably benefit from including them.

Now that’s all good and fine. Yet, in my surveys of late, I’ve found that people don’t really understand what I mean when I recommend whole grain, unprocessed carbs. In fact, the top five foods listed in my workshop surveys were:

1) Store-bought whole wheat bread

2) Quaker quick oats

3) Whole wheat pasta

4) Whole grain crackers

5) Brown rice

In addition to these five staples, I also found that people regularly included white and sweet potatoes, “whole grain” breakfast cereals, and “whole grain” chips in their lists. Interesting.

The Whole Grain Farce
Now, I’m not here to say that things like whole grain breads, crackers, and pastas are “bad for you.” Indeed, people are regularly eating foods that are much, much worse than these. Yet, I do think it important to note that when I recommend whole grain, unprocessed carbs, most of these foods don’t fit in. And they certainly don’t behave the same way in the body that unprocessed whole grains behave.

Now I know you’re about to give me your best “what you talkin’ about JB?” But hear me out.

Tony’s Still Looking Good – Must be Because of those Whole Grains.
Just because a food package says “whole grain,” that doesn’t mean the product is a whole grain food. I know, seems confusing at first. But bear with me. With the lax nutritional labeling standards we have nowadays, even foods like Frosted Flakes can qualify for the “whole grain” label because they’re adding small amounts of “whole grain corn” and “whole grain wheat” to the product.

Of course, the cover image doesn’t mention anything about the heavily processed ingredients including: sugar, high fructose corn syrup, processed rice, processed wheat, and a host of other additives and preservatives. Nope, the cover simply mentions what a wonderful source of “whole grains” and fiber this cereal is.

Also, and potentially more disturbing, is the fact that Krispy Kreme is jumping on the “whole grain” bandwagon, further diluting the meaning of “whole grain.” That’s right, THE Krispy Kreme is now offering a whole wheat, glazed donut.

Now, their corporate position suggests that these are healthier than non-whole grain donuts. And that can’t be a bad thing, can it? But seriously, how insulting does something have to get before our intelligence fights back?

Sure, there are folks that will try to assuage the guilt they associate with their donut addiction by suggesting that their addiction of choice now contains some “healthy stuff.” But I hope the rest of us see these for what they are. Deep fried, sugar coated, nutritionally empty fake foods with a little whole wheat sprinkled on top.

Krispy Kreme – Full of Whole Grain Goodness! (Cough)
Did you know that according to today’s label allowances, many products making the “whole grain” claim contain as little as 1% whole grain? Cue up the Frosted Flakes ad.

Here’s another beauty. Many manufacturers color their breads, crackers, and snacks brown (often with molasses) so that their foods sorta look like whole grains. What an embarassment. And this just scratches the shady surface of the “whole grain” industry.

So, let’s be clear on one thing. When I recommend whole, unprocessed carb sources, I’m recommending unprocessed foods that, in their entirety, are comprised of whole grains. Not foods that are highly processed (like breads, cereals, crackers, snacks, etc.). And not foods that have a light sprinkling of processed grains – included for marketing purposes, not for health purposes.

What Qualifies As A Whole Grain?
As a result of all the whole grain confusion I’m seeing, in Precision Nutrition V3 we decided to include notes on what qualifies as a healthy, whole grain, unprocessed carb.

More whole grains – whole wheat kernels, organic quinoa, and organic red quinoa.

Here’s an abbreviated list from PN V3:

Plain full flake or steel cut oats
Plain amaranth
Plain quinoa
Plan millet
Plain wheat berries
Plain barley
Plain wild rice
Now, you’ve probably already cringed at the word “plain” prefacing each of these grains. Don’t fret. I use this because nowadays companies do their best to “spice up” these foods, usually to the detriment of the food’s natural health properties. So it’s important to do the “spicing up” at home.

Indeed, you can turn plain quinoa, wheat berries, barley, or amaranth into amazingly tasting dishes with these grains by using some of the tips, recipes, and flavor combinations shared in both Gourmet Nutrition V1 (part of the Precision Nutrition System) and Gourmet Nutrition V2.

Also note, the preparation of whole grains is usually no more difficult than preparing rice. You can either throw them in a rice cooker and let them cook while you’re gone. Or you can throw them in water and let them simmer away until the water is absorbed by the grain.

Finally, if you’re not sure where to pick up your whole grains, grocery stores and supermarkets with bulk food sections usually have a decent selection. Further, specialty bulk stores like The Bulk Barn and a variety of health food stores also offer good selections of whole grains.

Can I Eat All I Want?
In a word, no!

Just because I’m extolling the virtues of whole grains in this article, that doesn’t mean you can eat all you want. These foods are still carbohydrate dense. So, understanding the goodness of grains doesn’t give you license to overeat them, and by extension, overeat calories and carbohydrates.

Instead, the Precision Nutrition principles still apply. Even when including whole grains, make sure to eat according to your body type. Also make sure to use nutrient timing. And finally, pay attention to your food sensitivities.

Whole Grain Recipes
Now that you’re all excited about whole grains, I’d like to refer you to a few whole grain recipes we share in Gourmet Nutrition V1 (part of the Precision Nutrition System) and Gourmet Nutrition V2.

Gourmet Nutrition V2 – The Cookbook For The Fit Food Lover
Gourmet Nutrition V1
Reeses Oatmeal – page 58
Oatmeal Apple Pie – page 63
Protein Pancakes – page 65
Roasted Chicken with Wheat Berries – page 89
Toasted Quinoa Salad – page 153

Gourmet Nutrition V2
Banana Cream Pie Oatmeal – page 42
Pumpkin Pie Oatmeal – page 44
Quinoa, Apple, and Walnut Salad with Turkey Sausage – page 146
Roasted Garlic Barley Risotto – page 206
Fruity Cashew Quinoa – 208
Chunky Tomato Spelt – page 210

If you’ve already got copies of GN V1 and GN V2, make sure to give these recipes some work. And if not, click here for GN V1 and here for GN V2.
PURCHASE COPIES OF YOUR GOURMET NUTRITION COOKBOOKS HERE

Advertisements

November 20, 2010 at 6:26 pm Leave a comment

6 Tips for a Fitter 2010 (definitely not your same old diet advise)

I am an avid reader and follower of the Precision Nutrition Network. The precision nutrition program is proven scientifically, its simple and it can fit into any lifestlye. Through the precision nutrition method of eating everyone can win and get the results they are looking for … or shall I say everyone can loose!

Here are 6 Unconventional Tips that are a sure fire way to prepare yourself psycologically to get in best shape of your life in 2010.

Except taken from John Bernardi – 6 tips for a fitter 2010!

1. Do Less — People make change hard on themselves by attempting to change too many things at once. They try to overhaul their diet, their exercise habits, their finances, their relationships, etc., all at once — and each of those changes is probably made up of 10-20 smaller behaviors that have to change. That’s a big mistake. Accept the fact that you can only change one behavior at a time, and you will succeed. Try to change more than one thing at a time, and you will fail. It’s really that simple.

2. Focus on your Nutrition – exercise doesn’t work — Two recent studies have shown that exercise alone, isn’t all that effective for helping people lose fat, gain lean, and improve their body composition. I know it’s hard to believe. But it’s totally true. Of course, I’m not telling you this to convince you that exercise is no good. Rather, I’m trying to make a much more important point. And that point is this. Exercise ALONE isn’t very effective at promoting weight loss. However, when you combine a proper exercise program PLUS the right nutrition habits, the sky’s the limit.

3. Find a Social Support Network — Fortunately, leanness also can also be contagious. If you hang out with people who INSPIRE you, who LIFT YOU UP, inevitably you’ll find yourself inspiring others, and lifting up those around you. Really, if you don’t have a strong social support circle, people who can help you, people who inspire you, people you can lean on, then that’s one of the first things that needs to improve in 2010.

4. Give yourself and Incentive or Reward — Its a reward big enough to help you overcome the inertia that keeps most people from getting fit. In 2010, if you’re committing to getting in better shape than ever before, what’s your incentive going to be? Are you going to have a body transformation contest with your friends? With your work colleagues? Is money going to be on the line? A vacation somewhere special? It doesn’t matter what the incentive is. But there has to be one. And it has to be big enough to keep you focused when your motivation wanes. Which it always does, even if for just a little while.

5. Take a Risk — I learned a lot about this principle in a book called “The Blackmail Diet.” It this book, Dr John Bear mentions that experts can tell you what to do to lose weight. But all of this advice doesn’t amount to a hill of beans if you’re not forced to stay on the plan when the motivation wanes, when things get hard, when life gets in the way. Even famous fiction author Steven King writes about this principle in the context of quitting smoking. So, you’ve got your reward down. Now let’s pick your punishment. What uncomfortable thing are you gonna use to keep yourself motivated, to create pressure to succeed?

6. Do Something – Anything – Right Now — In fitness and in life. If you don’t do it now, it’s not likely you’ll ever do it. I know, I know, you like to “do your research”, read, learn, reason, and decide. But, the chinese have a great saying that tells you exactly where that gets you: one who deliberates fully before taking their first step will spend their entire life on one leg. And the Americans have a simpler one: just do it. I’ve found that those who just do it, need 3 things. First, they need a sense of importance. At some deep level, you need to genuinely feel that changing your habits and your body is really important. Second, you need confidence. Not necessarily in yourself (although that helps). After all, almost everyone starting something new lacks confidence. No, you need confidence in your plan. You need to really believe that the plan you’re about to follow, will work. Third, you need a willingness to act. You see motivation comes and goes. And the trick is to strike when the iron is hot. To act decisively when the motivation is there. The key is to do something positive, anything, right now. To be decisive, and act in a way that brings you even an inch closer to your dream. If you can do it on your own, go for it. If you need help, get it. It doesn’t matter what it is. As long as it’s positive and you can do it in the next 5 minutes.

If you liked what you read above… you can check out the full article and videos from John Bernardi at 6 Important Tips for a Fitter 2010.

Now, JUST DO IT!

January 11, 2010 at 9:50 pm Leave a comment

Learn How to Vaccinate Yourself against Body Fat

This week I’ve shared with you two blog posts in which Dr
John Berardi talks about losing body weight (and body fat).

The first one talks about how important incentives are for
changing your body. And it goes on to incentivize you with
a whopping $40,000 in prize money.

Could The Chance To Win $10,000 Help You Get In Shape?

The second one shows you how to coerce yourself into
sticking to the plan, even when the motivation wanes.

Enter “the best kept secret in weight loss.”

Finally, today, I have one last post to share.

In this one, Dr Berardi talks about how you can actually
vaccinate yourself against body fat. Hint: it doesn’t
involve needles!

Learn how to vaccinate yourself against body fat

January 1, 2010 at 1:25 pm Leave a comment

Could the chance to win $10,000 help you get in shape?

When Dr. John Berardi dropped me an line the other day,
telling me all about his new program, I thought for a second
the guy had lost his mind.

http://precisionnutrition.com/cmd.php?pageid=1106541&u=win-40k
Now, don’t get me wrong. I respect Dr Berardi. He’s
recognized as one of the top nutrition coaches in the world.
And his programs get people results. Fast.

However, when I watched this video he sent over, and learned
that he’s giving away $40,000 of his own money, he
definitely got my attention.

Check out this blog post for yourself.
http://precisionnutrition.com/cmd.php?pageid=1106541&u=win-40k

Now, to qualify for this reward, you have to participate in
the Lean Eating program. But that’s a no brainer. You
should want to do that ANYWAY if you’re interested in body
transformation because there is nothing else like it.

You get 6 months of world class coaching, the type of
coaching you can’t find, well, anywhere. And, during these
6 months, if you achieve the best body transformation,
you’ll win 10K.

http://precisionnutrition.com/cmd.php?pageid=1106541&u=win-40k

Worst case scenario, you come out with the best body of your
life. Best case scenario, you come out with the best body
of your life, and 10 GRAND.

So, I highly encourage you to check out this post below. In
it, Dr Berardi shares with you two critical components for
body transformation success.

And then he tells you exactly how one man and one woman are
going to swoop in and claim $10 G’s of his own money.

http://precisionnutrition.com/cmd.php?pageid=1106541&u=win-40k

Now, this message is time sensitive. No, it’s not gonna
self-destruct or anything. However, spots are limited in
this program. And LOTS of people want in.

So, if you’re interested in finding out exactly how to eat
to get in the best shape of your life, click the link below.
10 grand may be waiting for you on the other side:

http://precisionnutrition.com/cmd.php?pageid=1106541&u=win-40k

December 16, 2009 at 9:08 pm Leave a comment

All About Energy Drinks

All About Energy Drinks
by Ryan Andrews, November 30th, 2009.

Cocaine. BooKoo. Mother. V. These are just a few of the hundreds of energy drinks now available on the market. Are these names supposed to be amusing? Or just downright disturbing?

Of course, and who can forget the infamous PowerThirst. It’s energy for men. It’s “menergy.”

OK, that last one is funny! But seriously, am I at a rave… or at the gym? It’s hard to tell.

What are energy drinks and why are they important?

In 1997, I just passed my driver’s license test. And in the same year Red Bull was introduced in the U.S. Over the next 6 years the sale of energy drinks in the U.S. increased about 465%.

In response, one question that I always ask is this one. Why would somebody need more energy?

I mean, the only time energy levels bottom out is when we skip sleep, skip workouts, and consume pathetic foods. Wait a minute, I just described most of North America. Ok, I guess I do understand why people are drawn to canned pick-me-ups!

Interestingly, the term “energy drink” is not recognized by the FDA or USDA. The details around regulation of these drinks are, well, kind of boring. Except for the following:

In the U.S., an over-the-counter medication for energy (like No-Doz) containing 100 mg of caffeine must include lots of warnings.
But the 24 ouncer of “knock your socks off energy beverage” from 7-11 that contains 500 mg of caffeine can be marketed with no warnings.

Badass or loser?

Energy drinks are now a $3.4 billion per year industry. The U.S. leads the world in total volume sales of energy drinks. In 2006, 31% of teens in the U.S. reported drinking them. We are talking about nearly 8 million teens — who are potentially consuming teeth-rattling amounts of caffeine and sugar.

What you should know about energy drinks

Have you ever heard of Red Bull? In 2002, it commanded about 50% of energy drink revenue. Let’s break down the ingredients. It contains:

Carbonated water
Sucrose
Glucose
Sodium citrate
Taurine
Glucuronolactone
Caffeine
Inositol
B vitamins (B3, B5, B6, B12)
Flavours and colours
We’ll take them one at a time.

Carbonated water
This is water dissolved with carbon dioxide. Doesn’t do much for energy or health – but it can make you bloated.

Sucrose/glucose
Unless your drink is sugar-free, you will find some form of added sugar. Per 8 ounces, the sugar content is between 20 and 35 grams for most drinks.

Glucose is the major energy source for the brain, red blood cells, and muscles. Consuming glucose with caffeine can enhance concentration. Too much sugar, though, will lead to a big waistline rather than big energy. Oh, and cavities.

A 24 ounce can of BooKoo has 81 grams of sugar. That’s the same amount as a medium Butterfinger blizzard from Dairy Queen.

Sodium citrate
More commonly known as citric acid. This is a preservative that also provides a tart taste. Lots of it may cause GI upset. And it has been known to erode tooth enamel.

Taurine
This is a sulfur containing amino acid that we can make from methionine and cysteine. It’s found mainly in muscle tissue and can:

Help to regulate water, mineral & homocysteine levels
Help contribute to bile acid formation
Improve muscle contractility and protect against muscle stress in animals.
Help to prevent atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus, but results are mixed. Taurine has actually worsened lipid panels in animals.
A dose of nearly 5 grams might be needed to notice any effect. Most energy drinks contain much less.

Consuming taurine from food/supplements seems to have minimal impact on blood levels, yet strangely, it still concentrates in organs and tissues. Taurine is highly water soluble and excreted by the kidneys.

The wonderful world of taurine Those who probably shouldn’t experiment with taurine:

Anyone with kidney disease. It won’t be readily excreted and supplementation can lead to accumulation in tissues (and lots of dizzy spells). Anyone who doesn’t like itching. Supplementing taurine can cause itching. Those with epilepsy. Supplementing taurine can cause nausea, dizziness, and a headache

Glucuronolactone
This naturally occurring glucose metabolite can help to reduce glycogen breakdown during workouts. It can help improve alertness too. It’s found naturally in very small amounts. Once ingested, it’s transformed in the liver and excreted via urine. That’s about all there is to say about this stuff.

Caffeine
90% of us (in the U.S.) consume caffeine each day. A typical energy drink contains between 50 and 500 mg of caffeine per can/bottle. 500 mg is like drinking 14 cans of cola or 5 strong cups of coffee. Zowie!

How many energy drinks before you die? Find out here:
http://www.energyfiend.com/death-by-caffeine

Caffeine is one of the most widely studied, and most effective, ergogenic acids on the planet. Consuming 5 mg/kg of caffeine can enhance performance, both in the short- and long-term.

Caffeine is a methylxanthine and acts as an adenosine receptor antagonist, which can enhance CNS activation and blood epinephrine. It can also improve muscle contractility.

Caffeine seems to be more beneficial for those who don’t use it on a regular basis. When combined with taurine, the effects seem to be additive.

Inositol
This is found in various foods and is necessary for insulin signal transduction. It can also be made by the body, so it’s non-essential.

B vitamins
The B vitamins are important for long-term adaptation to exercise. A B vitamin deficiency is bad news. But relying on a daily Red Bull shooter to meet your micronutrient needs is also pretty pathetic. Regular energy drink consumption is more likely to lead to toxicity.

Vitamin B3, aka niacinimide
Toxicity: Supplemental forms may cause flushing of skin, itching, impaired glucose tolerance, nausea, liver toxicity and gastrointestinal upset. Intake of 750 mg per day for less than 3 months can cause liver damage.

Vitamin B5, aka calcium pantothenate or pantothenic acid
Toxicity: Nausea, heartburn and diarrhea may be noticed with high dose supplements.

Vitamin B6
Toxicity: High doses of supplemental forms may result in painful neurological symptoms.

Vitamin B12
Toxicity: None known from supplements. Only a small amount is absorbed via oral route making the potential for toxicity low.

Flavours and colours
Even nutrition degenerates know these aren’t a good idea to consume on a regular basis.

Do energy drinks actually give people more energy? Energy drinks with sugar and caffeine may enhance performance slightly. However, it appears that the sugar-free varieties don’t match up. This might be due to the synergistic effect of caffeine and carbohydrates before workouts.

Pre-workout energy drinks seem to increase endurance and strength, but the results vary depending on exact ingredients.

Energy drinks don’t seem to improve memory very well, but they might improve reaction time. This holds true with sugared and sugar-free versions.

Energy drinks & alcohol
Guess what? Lots of booze isn’t associated with better test scores and more volunteer hours at the food bank. It’s associated with injuries, sexual assault, drunk driving, liver disease, and death. Not good.

Almost 25% of college drinkers report mixing alcohol with energy drinks. Before you chase your booze with an energy drink, you might want to make those last minute changes in your will.

Mixing energy drinks and booze can lead to heart rhythm disturbances and false assumptions regarding your level of intoxication. Further, alcohol and energy drinks lead to higher blood lactate, blood pressure and stress hormones.

Summary and recommendations
From a health perspective, energy drinks probably aren’t the best idea.

An energy drink that contains lots of sugar doesn’t make much sense, unless you’re participating in extended/repeated bouts of intense training. Energy drinks with artificial sweeteners probably aren’t wise either. Read more here: All About Diet Sodas.

On the performance side, the amount of “energizing” ingredients in most energy drinks are generally too low to notice a benefit or detriment, except for the caffeine.

And yes, there are still degenerates mixing energy drinks with alcohol. I would think common sense clues us in to how this might turn out, but since 24% of college students report mixing these drinks in the past month, looks like I’m the foolish one. Energy drinks can mask alcohol intoxication symptoms. This means your chances of walking off of the roof into the pool increase exponentially.

Think about the budget factor as well. What are we spending our money on when buying energy drinks? If you buy an energy drink three times per week, 40 weeks out of the year, that’s about $180.

Finally, consider why someone would “need” an energy drink.

How is their nutrition?
Are they overfat and lethargic?
Are they getting adequate sleep?
Do they take lots of meds with side effects?
Are they exercising?
Getting those habits dialed in might give you more than enough energy each day.

Further resources
Who needs Red Bull? Try Purple Bull!

Other interesting information about energy drinks
Energy drinks are a drain on water reserves. Producing 1 litre of energy drink requires approximately 2.5 litres of water.

Some people use inositol as a cutting agent with cocaine and methamphetamines.

There have been reported cases of seizures in those consuming high amounts of energy drinks (among individuals with no prior history of seizures).

Energy drinks may increase likelihood of manic episodes.

Thailand leads the world in energy drink consumption (per person – not in total volume).

Caffeine has been shown to increase alcohol consumption in rats.

PowerThirst now comes in flavours like Manana. (Just kidding.)

References
Forbes SC, et al. Effect of Red Bull energy drink on repeated Wingate cycle performance and bench press muscle endurance. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 2007;17:433-444.

IFIC Q & A – Energy drinks and health. July 2009. http://www.ific.org/publications/qa/energydrinkqa.cfm

Teens abusing energy boosting drinks, doctors fear. October 2006. http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,226223,00.html

Babu KM, et al. Energy drinks: The new eye-opener for adolescents. Clin Ped Emerg Med 2008;9:35-42.

Reissig CJ, et al. Caffeinated energy drinks – a growing problem. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2009;99:1-10.

Candow DG, et al. Effect of sugar-free Red Bull energy drink on high-intensity run time-to-exhaustion in young adults. J Strength Cond Res 2009;23:1271-1275.

Wesseling S, Koeners MP, Joles JA. Taurine – Red Bull or Red Herring? Hypertension 2009;53:909-911.

Lovett R. Coffee: The demon drink? New Scientist. 2005.

Warburton DM, et al. An evaluation of a caffeinated taurine drink on mood, memory and information processing in healthy volunteers without caffeine abstinence. Psychopharmacology 2001;158:322-328.

Clauson KA, et al. Safety issues associated with commercially available energy drinks. J Am Pharm Assoc 2008;48:e55-e67.

O’Brien MC, et al. Caffeinated cocktails: Energy drink consumption, high-risk drinking, and alcohol related consequences among college students. Academic Emerg Med 2008;15:453-460.

Beck TW, et al. The acute effects of a caffeine-containing supplement on strength, muscular endurance, and anaerobic capabilities. J Strength Cond Res 2006;20:506-510.

Huxtable RJ. Physiological actions of taurine. Physiol Rev 1992;72:101-163.

Hoffman JR, et al. Effect of a pre-exercise energy supplement on the acute hormonal response to resistance exercise. J Strength Cond Res 2008;22:874-882.

Zhang M, et al. Role of taurine supplementation to prevent exercise-induced oxidative stress in healthy young men. Amino Acids 2004;26:203-207.

Curry K & Stasio MJ. The effects of energy drinks alone and with alcohol on neuropsychological functioning. Hum Psychopharmacol Clin Exp 2009;24:473-481.

December 7, 2009 at 9:04 pm Leave a comment


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 19 other followers

Tennessee Kettlebell

Russian Kettlebell Certified Instructor

RKC Instructor- Get Certified

Buy Kettlebells Here

Be Strong Be Amazing- KettleBells for Women

Calendar

October 2017
S M T W T F S
« Jun    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Tennessee Kettlebell Fan Page

Kettlebell Goddess

KettleBell Goddess DVD Plus Kettlebell

Better Workout Better Results

Enter The Kettlebell From Russia With Tough Love TENNESSEE KETTLEBELL

GET HKC Certified

HKC Certification

RKC Certification Workshops — Register Today!

Become an Elite Trainer