Posts tagged ‘diet’

A Whole Grain Krispy Kreme Donut?

I wanted to share this awesome article on Whole Grains by John M. Berardi. It is really sad the marketing that goes behind keeping America unhealthy. I cannot tell you how many time I have heard, “I eat whole grains, I have switched to cooking with whole wheat pasta”. Really, people truly believe they are eating healthier by switching to whole wheate pasta! A few highlights as mentioned in the article below I feel are very important to remember. (1) What are Unprocessed Whole Grains, do you research and know what these are! (2) Eating Whole Grains does not give you a lisence to over eat on these carbohydrates (3) Please do not fall for the marketing messages of these mega food companies, I cannot think of a better analogy than a Whole Grain Krispy Kreme donut or Whole Grain Frosted Flakes. (4) Just because these carbs are “safe”, doesn’t mean that you can eat them anytime.

Enjoy the artile, it’s a good one!

The Safe Carbs – Whole Grains
by John M Berardi, March 11th, 2009.

The Whole Grain Survey
A few weeks back I gave a nutrition workshop and during the event I asked the attendees to come up with a list of unprocessed, whole grain carbohydrates they consume on a regular basis. Now, at this point, I’d like you to do the same.

Get out a piece of paper, take a minute, and write down 6 unprocessed whole grain carbs that you have in your house right now and eat on a regular basis. Seriously, go ahead. Put ‘em down. And be specific.

Unprocessed, Whole Grain Food #1-

Unprocessed, Whole Grain Food #2 –

Unprocessed, Whole Grain Food #3 –

Unprocessed, Whole Grain Food #4 –

Unprocessed, Whole Grain Food #5 –

Unprocessed, Whole Grain Food #6 –

Ok now, let’s talk whole grains.

What’s A Whole Grain?
Interestingly, during the workshop discussed above, I learned something very important. And the lesson was this. Most people have no idea what experts are talking about when they recommend unprocessed, whole grain carb sources.

This was particularly eye-opening for me because I regularly encourage folks to do just that. In seminars. In articles. And in a few spots in Precision Nutrition V3.

This is because whole grain, unprocessed carbs offer the following benefits:

They’re high in fiber, helping us maintain a healthy GI tract
They’re slow to digest, helping us control blood sugar
They’re loaded with vitamins and minerals, improving our nutrient density
They’re satisfying, helping us control appetite
As a result of these benefits above, whole grain, unprocessed carbohydrate sources tend to be much better handled, even by those with naturally poor carbohydrate tolerance, than the more heavily processed starchy carbohydrate sources like breads, pastas, rices, crackers, and cereals.

Comfort Food For Some – Unhealthy For Most
That’s right, even if you don’t think you can “handle carbs”, you can probably eat a moderate amount of whole grain, unprocessed carbs. And not only can you “get away” with it. You’d probably benefit from including them.

Now that’s all good and fine. Yet, in my surveys of late, I’ve found that people don’t really understand what I mean when I recommend whole grain, unprocessed carbs. In fact, the top five foods listed in my workshop surveys were:

1) Store-bought whole wheat bread

2) Quaker quick oats

3) Whole wheat pasta

4) Whole grain crackers

5) Brown rice

In addition to these five staples, I also found that people regularly included white and sweet potatoes, “whole grain” breakfast cereals, and “whole grain” chips in their lists. Interesting.

The Whole Grain Farce
Now, I’m not here to say that things like whole grain breads, crackers, and pastas are “bad for you.” Indeed, people are regularly eating foods that are much, much worse than these. Yet, I do think it important to note that when I recommend whole grain, unprocessed carbs, most of these foods don’t fit in. And they certainly don’t behave the same way in the body that unprocessed whole grains behave.

Now I know you’re about to give me your best “what you talkin’ about JB?” But hear me out.

Tony’s Still Looking Good – Must be Because of those Whole Grains.
Just because a food package says “whole grain,” that doesn’t mean the product is a whole grain food. I know, seems confusing at first. But bear with me. With the lax nutritional labeling standards we have nowadays, even foods like Frosted Flakes can qualify for the “whole grain” label because they’re adding small amounts of “whole grain corn” and “whole grain wheat” to the product.

Of course, the cover image doesn’t mention anything about the heavily processed ingredients including: sugar, high fructose corn syrup, processed rice, processed wheat, and a host of other additives and preservatives. Nope, the cover simply mentions what a wonderful source of “whole grains” and fiber this cereal is.

Also, and potentially more disturbing, is the fact that Krispy Kreme is jumping on the “whole grain” bandwagon, further diluting the meaning of “whole grain.” That’s right, THE Krispy Kreme is now offering a whole wheat, glazed donut.

Now, their corporate position suggests that these are healthier than non-whole grain donuts. And that can’t be a bad thing, can it? But seriously, how insulting does something have to get before our intelligence fights back?

Sure, there are folks that will try to assuage the guilt they associate with their donut addiction by suggesting that their addiction of choice now contains some “healthy stuff.” But I hope the rest of us see these for what they are. Deep fried, sugar coated, nutritionally empty fake foods with a little whole wheat sprinkled on top.

Krispy Kreme – Full of Whole Grain Goodness! (Cough)
Did you know that according to today’s label allowances, many products making the “whole grain” claim contain as little as 1% whole grain? Cue up the Frosted Flakes ad.

Here’s another beauty. Many manufacturers color their breads, crackers, and snacks brown (often with molasses) so that their foods sorta look like whole grains. What an embarassment. And this just scratches the shady surface of the “whole grain” industry.

So, let’s be clear on one thing. When I recommend whole, unprocessed carb sources, I’m recommending unprocessed foods that, in their entirety, are comprised of whole grains. Not foods that are highly processed (like breads, cereals, crackers, snacks, etc.). And not foods that have a light sprinkling of processed grains – included for marketing purposes, not for health purposes.

What Qualifies As A Whole Grain?
As a result of all the whole grain confusion I’m seeing, in Precision Nutrition V3 we decided to include notes on what qualifies as a healthy, whole grain, unprocessed carb.

More whole grains – whole wheat kernels, organic quinoa, and organic red quinoa.

Here’s an abbreviated list from PN V3:

Plain full flake or steel cut oats
Plain amaranth
Plain quinoa
Plan millet
Plain wheat berries
Plain barley
Plain wild rice
Now, you’ve probably already cringed at the word “plain” prefacing each of these grains. Don’t fret. I use this because nowadays companies do their best to “spice up” these foods, usually to the detriment of the food’s natural health properties. So it’s important to do the “spicing up” at home.

Indeed, you can turn plain quinoa, wheat berries, barley, or amaranth into amazingly tasting dishes with these grains by using some of the tips, recipes, and flavor combinations shared in both Gourmet Nutrition V1 (part of the Precision Nutrition System) and Gourmet Nutrition V2.

Also note, the preparation of whole grains is usually no more difficult than preparing rice. You can either throw them in a rice cooker and let them cook while you’re gone. Or you can throw them in water and let them simmer away until the water is absorbed by the grain.

Finally, if you’re not sure where to pick up your whole grains, grocery stores and supermarkets with bulk food sections usually have a decent selection. Further, specialty bulk stores like The Bulk Barn and a variety of health food stores also offer good selections of whole grains.

Can I Eat All I Want?
In a word, no!

Just because I’m extolling the virtues of whole grains in this article, that doesn’t mean you can eat all you want. These foods are still carbohydrate dense. So, understanding the goodness of grains doesn’t give you license to overeat them, and by extension, overeat calories and carbohydrates.

Instead, the Precision Nutrition principles still apply. Even when including whole grains, make sure to eat according to your body type. Also make sure to use nutrient timing. And finally, pay attention to your food sensitivities.

Whole Grain Recipes
Now that you’re all excited about whole grains, I’d like to refer you to a few whole grain recipes we share in Gourmet Nutrition V1 (part of the Precision Nutrition System) and Gourmet Nutrition V2.

Gourmet Nutrition V2 – The Cookbook For The Fit Food Lover
Gourmet Nutrition V1
Reeses Oatmeal – page 58
Oatmeal Apple Pie – page 63
Protein Pancakes – page 65
Roasted Chicken with Wheat Berries – page 89
Toasted Quinoa Salad – page 153

Gourmet Nutrition V2
Banana Cream Pie Oatmeal – page 42
Pumpkin Pie Oatmeal – page 44
Quinoa, Apple, and Walnut Salad with Turkey Sausage – page 146
Roasted Garlic Barley Risotto – page 206
Fruity Cashew Quinoa – 208
Chunky Tomato Spelt – page 210

If you’ve already got copies of GN V1 and GN V2, make sure to give these recipes some work. And if not, click here for GN V1 and here for GN V2.
PURCHASE COPIES OF YOUR GOURMET NUTRITION COOKBOOKS HERE

November 20, 2010 at 6:26 pm Leave a comment

All About Soy

All About Soy
by Ryan Andrews, March 23rd, 2009.

What is soy?
The soybean plant originated in China and made its way to North America in 1765. Soy production in North America started as a means to feed animals, only becoming a food crop for humans in the early 1900s. Genetic modification of soybeans was introduced in 1995; today, about 90% of the soybeans grown are genetically modified.

Soybeans may contain up to 48% protein with a PDCAA score (a measure of protein quality) just below 1.0, with soy protein isolate at 1.0. 1.0 is the highest score a protein can get, and soy ranks up there with milk, beef, and egg proteins. The ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fat in soybeans is about 1:7, which is sensible, especially when compared to oils like sunflower and peanut which are 1:100+.

Soybeans contain a mix of slow-digesting carbohydrates, including fibre and other starches that may be good for promoting the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut. Thus, for people who do not have an intolerance to soy, soy could be considered GI-friendly.

What you should know about soy
Cultural observation tells us that most traditional cuisines in Asia don’t incorporate soy as a staple food. The average soy intake in East Asian populations is between 40 – 90 grams per day (1.5 to 3 ounces). That’s total soy intake (not soy protein grams). This amount of soy provides 10 – 20 grams of soy protein. Soy foods are typically used as a condiment to the main dish and used in a “whole food” form such as edamame, or fermented, as in miso, tofu, natto and soy sauce. The FDA recommends 25 grams of soy protein per day as part of a balanced diet.

In North America, refined soy products such as soy concentrates, textured soy, and soy lecithin are finding their way into more processed foods. Between 2000 and 2007, U.S. food manufacturers introduced over 2,700 new foods with soy as an ingredient. These forms of processed soy are what most people equate with soy consumption (rather than the whole food and fermented forms in traditional Asian cuisines).

Sales of soy products have drastically increased, perhaps due to health claims made about soy

Why is eating soy so important?
Hundreds of foods, including soy, contain phytoestrogens (PEs), also known as isoflavones (a type of flavonoid — the same flavonoids that make tomatoes, green tea and red wine “healthy”). In the plants, they serve as a defense mechanism and fungicide. In humans, PEs, which include genistein, daidzein and glycytein, act as natural estrogen receptor modulators. PEs are similar in structure to estradiol, a form of human estrogen. They have both weak estrogen-stimulating and estrogen-inhibiting effects, depending on the circumstance. The UK Committee on Toxicity (2003) noted that PEs bind weakly to the sex-hormone binding proteins and are unlikely to prevent estrogen or androgen binding (at normal blood levels).

PEs provide the basis for much of the current soy controversy. When soy protein isolates and concentrates are created from soybeans, PE (and phytonutrient) content is diminished due to the alcohol used in extraction. However, some remain.

Phytoestrogen content of selected foods
Food Serving Total PEs (mg)
Soy protein concentrate, water wash 3.5 oz 102
Soy protein concentrate, alcohol wash 3.5 oz 12
Miso ½ cup 59
Soybeans, cooked ½ cup 47
Tempeh 3 ounces 37
Soybeans, dry roasted 1 ounce 37
Soy milk 1 cup 30
Tofu based yogurt ½ cup 21
Tofu 3 ounces 20
Soybeans, green, cooked (Edamame) ½ cup 12
Soy hot dog 1 hot dog 11
Soy sausage 3 links 3
Soy cheese, mozzarella 1 oz 2

A traditional daily intake of soy for someone may include 6 ounces of tofu, a half-cup or soy milk, and a ½ cup of edamame. That would provide roughly 75 mg of PEs. This is well below the amount necessary for having an unfavorable influence on hormone levels. However, as the chart above shows, a high intake from some processed soy products could easily provide much more.

We still can’t predict exactly how PEs will function after we swallow them. The actual effects depend on total amount of PEs in the body, receptor binding affinities, and possibly a host of genetic factors. Despite these mixed results and a lack of consensus, there is a common theme: extremely high levels of PEs have an unfavorable influence on hormone levels for both men and women, and may inhibit muscle gain and fat loss to some degree.

Soy and cancer
Prostate cancer is low in countries that regularly consume soy and rodent studies have also found that PEs inhibit the development of prostate cancer and prostate tumor metastasis.

Soy and PE consumption does not seem to affect the endometrium in premenopausal women, although there have been weak estrogenic effects reported in breast tissue. Thus, studies in women have mostly shown beneficial effects (in cancer prevention), although the magnitude of the effects is small and of vague significance. If someone has existing cancer, it’s critical to know if the cancer is estrogen receptor positive. If it is, then it may be wise to avoid foods with a higher PE content.

Soy and pregnancy
Although there are still questions regarding in utero or early postnatal exposure, the low potencies and concentrations of PEs in the diet compared with the hormones manufactured in the body make it unlikely that adverse effects occur at common exposure. PEs in mom’s diet will appear in breast milk, but PE intake of breastfed infants is negligible. The American Association of Pediatrics cautiously recommends giving soy-based formula to infants, but only in cases where other options are insufficient.

Soy and sperm
There is a body of research in which controlled amounts of soy were fed to humans or primates and no negative effects on quantity, quality, or sperm motility were noticed. Could eating a lot more soy potentially lower sperm count? Sure. Is it something you should be concerned with? Probably not, unless you’re trying to make those sperm earn their rent.

Soy and bones
A meta-analysis (done on women) showed a significant benefit of PEs on spine bone density, especially when PEs were given in higher doses and for longer periods. A second meta-analysis showed that PEs significantly increased bone formation and decreased bone breakdown. Translation = soy PEs could be helpful for bones.

Soy and body composition
A review found that individuals lost equivalent amounts of weight (and inches in some cases), using soy protein, dairy milk meal replacements, and beef or pork at equal calorie levels. When soy protein supplements are used as part of a sensible training program and varied, calorie-sufficient diet, they act much in the same way that other protein supplements might act: increases in lean body mass, decreases in stress hormone responses to training, and improvements in performance. (See, for example, this study.)

Soy and anti-nutrients
Soy foods contain trypsin inhibitors and phytic acid, substances that can inhibit nutrient absorption. These substances are deactivated by cooking and fermentation. Thus, consuming cooked and fermented soy foods is unlikely to inhibit protein and mineral absorption. Also, phytic acid may have anti-cancer properties. Goitrogens found in soy (and other vegetables) only seem to cause thyroid problems when iodine intake is low and soy intake is high. Iodine can be obtained naturally from foods such as sea salt and sea vegetables (aka seaweed, e.g. kelp, dulse, etc.)

Soy and the heart
Heart health is influenced by the sum of one’s diet and lifestyle, not an ounce of miso. Small amounts of whole soy foods may help to control cholesterol levels.

Soy and the kidneys
Soy protein, despite being of high quality, doesn’t appear to have the same effect on kidney function that occurs in response to animal proteins. So, if your doc, or your mom, still gets worried about the high protein meals, mix in some soy for good measure.

Other interesting information about soy
The World Health Organization has identified soy as a high quality protein that can meet all of the essential amino acid requirements of humans.

Soy sauce and soy oil do not contain PEs.

Tamoxifen has long been an effective treatment for women with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. In a study conducted in mice, researchers found that when genistein (a PE) is consumed as part of the daily diet, it can stop the ability of tamoxifen to halt breast cancer growth.

Summary and recommendations
In general, it’s hard to go wrong with whole, unprocessed foods. Problems typically occur with processed food, in all forms including soy. Manufacturing processes remove the dietary fibre, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals, and hundreds of other helpful plant chemicals — leaving behind almost pure soy protein. The whole is healthier than the parts.

Although some studies show limited or conflicting results, when viewed in its entirety, the current literature supports the safety of PEs as typically consumed in diets that include small amounts of whole soy foods.

It seems best to avoid consuming isolated and highly refined forms of soy (such as soy isolates, soy concentrates, textured soy protein, etc.) on a regular basis. Whole soybeans, soy milks, tofu, tempeh, and miso, on the other hand, are better options. In terms of total intake, we’d say 1-2 servings (a serving is 1 cup of soy milk and 4 ounces of tofu/tempeh/soybeans) of soy per day seems to be a safe and potentially healthy intake, but exceeding 3 servings per day on a regular basis may not be a good idea.

We don’t think soy is anything special in terms of disease prevention. Nor do we think it’s extremely harmful in your quest for optimal health, body comp, or performance. With that said, we do caution against excessive soy intake.

Further resources
Iowa State University Database On The Isoflavone Content Of Foods

References
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Swan SH, et al. Semen quality of fertile US males in relation to their mothers’ beef consumption during pregnancy. Hum Reprod 2007;22:1497-1502.

Evans EM, et al. Effects of soy protein isolate and moderate exercise on bone turnover and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women. Menopause 2007;14:481-488.

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February 21, 2010 at 10:20 pm Leave a comment

Excerpt from “Mark’s Daily Apple”

Below is an excerpt from a great blog “Mark’s Daily Apple”. This blog that was sent to me by my husband as one to follow. We are always talking about this topic below and struggle wth reaching out to the people who mean the most in our lives. We wonder why they don’t understand our reasons and practices of “primal” eating. I could not have summed it up better than the blog below. I guess some things we just need to let go and and let people see the differences such practices can make in ones life. This blog was an emotional read for me and any other primal eaters out there I am sure you will feel the same way!

Enjoy ~HD

Monday’s “Dear Mark” sparked a great discussion about raising healthy kids, but the conversation really got going (in the comment board and forum) when readers lamented the hard-headedness of their parents.

Yes, we too often paint younger folks as the impulsive, devil-may-care madcaps or hapless Pied Piper targets. Truth is, there are plenty of those qualities in every age demographic. Kids aren’t the only ones who can dig in their heels after all. So, to take on the flipside of Monday’s question, what’s a Primal child (of any age) to do when Mom and Dad are the ones whose health needs a major overhaul?

I venture to say that many more people find themselves in the role of concerned progeny than those who commented Monday. Far too many of us, I imagine, have been grudging witnesses over the years to our parents’ destructive health habits – whether it be crummy diet, complete lack of physical activity, smoking, workaholic lifestyle, chronic stress, or – who knows – compulsive use of household insecticides. Sometimes it’s ignorance on their part. Other times it’s denial. In some cases, it’s flat out apathy.

We drop hints at dinner. We drop pamphlets, articles or whole books on their coffee tables. At turns, we find ourselves lecturing. We argue. We offer to help – to make dinner, suggest some relaxation techniques or pay for a gym membership. In the midst of the back and forth, some of us deal with the frustration better than others. Perhaps those of us who recently moved out or are in the process of doing so are just glad to be on our own, away from the influence for a while. However, for many of us it’s an ongoing source of disappointment and even an emotional roadblock in the relationship.

The questions nag at the back of our brains and maybe tug at the heart strings a little. Why won’t they listen to reason? Why don’t they value their own health? Don’t they want to live to be there for their grandchildren – for me? How can it not bother them to be giving up decades of their lives or at least the hope of some additional active and independent years? What am I supposed to do here? Will anything I do or say make any difference whatsoever?

Step Back
As difficult as it is, maybe the first step in dealing with the quandary is this: we should all take a step back. (A big breath helps too.) There’s a certain freedom in accepting that you aren’t responsible for another person’s choices. Although you certainly have a big stake in their health, in their independence, in their well-being, in their being in this world period, the fact is and will always remain that you don’t run their lives. If you genuinely worry for them, it’s a painful realization, but at least it can stop you from beating your head against the wall. It’s not your fault. It’s not under your control. It’s sad and horribly unfortunate that they stand a big chance of missing out on some of their good years as well as your life and your kids’, but there it is. Ultimately, it’s out of your hands. Que Sera isn’t a comforting concept, but it can be a liberating one.

Don’t Apologize for Your Lifestyle
Just as they are going to live their lives the way they want, make no bones about doing the same for yourself. Stop feeling guilty for refusing your mother’s pie at Thanksgiving if you don’t want it. Stop apologizing for bringing your own food to their house or turning down Sunday night get-togethers if that’s a good workout night for you. Stop caving to their pushing treats on the grandkids. Maybe the more you stand by your lifestyle, the more seriously they’ll take it. If not, you’ll at least feel more in control of your own life and less swept up by their choices.

Appreciate Small Changes
Just because you accept that you don’t control the ultimate outcome doesn’t mean you can’t leave the door open for them to change or that you can’t make the adjoining room all the more inviting. I’d never say give up encouraging your parents to get healthy. Nonetheless, it’s all about perspective. When you take yourself out of the role of health director or even rescuer, you’re in a much better mindset to encourage, see and appreciate smaller changes. You’re not caught up in the vision of deep and desperate change for them. Once you take the pressure off, they might soften up a bit and surprise you.

Offer Some Healthy Bonding Opportunities
So, your dad probably isn’t going to ever accompany you to a PrimalCon event, but maybe you can convince him to go for a walk on a nice spring day. Though your mother will never give up her carbs, she’ll love spending Sunday brunch at your house (with your food) when she can have fun with the grandkids. Invite your parents to participate in your life – and the lifestyle that goes along with it. Find things that both of you can enjoy and get something out of.

Finally, however frustrating or unchanging your parents’ choices are, enjoy your time with them. Live life to the fullest with them as much as you can. Show them you care and that you enjoy their company. Let them know they’re an important part of your life. In the best or worst circumstances, you’ll be glad you did. There’s an old fable in which the sun and wind compete to see who can get the coat off a man passing by. In the harshness of the wind, the man simply clutches his coat more tightly. In the sun’s warmth, he happily casts it aside. In the best circumstances, perhaps warmth and love provide the best inspiration for healthy change.

Have your own stories and strategies for prodding your parents or other family members toward a healthier lifestyle? Thanks for reading.

February 6, 2010 at 6:16 pm Leave a comment

Receipe of the Week

Hawaiian Pizza

Crust:
1/2 Cup Whole Wheat Flour
1/2 Cup Wheat Bran
1/4 tsp Baking Powder
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup water
Pie:
1 cup tomoato sauce, spiced with garlic, oregano and basil
1/5 cups cottage cheese
1 egg
8 oz turkey ham, chopped
1 small can (6oz.) pinapple chuncks, drained
1 medium bell pepper, chopped
3/4 cup reduced fat mozzarella cheese
Instructions:
Mix the crust ingredients together in a large bowl, then spread into a 9×12 inc pan, spreading the curst 1-inch up the side of th pan. Bake the crust by itself for 5 minutes in an oven at 425 degrees F.

Blend the cottage cheese and egg together in a food precesser or blender until the mixture is smooth. Add the ingredients to the pre-baked crust in the following order: tomoato sauce, cottage cheese/egg, mozzarella, turkey ham, pinapple chuncks, green pepper. Bake for 20-25 minutes at 425 degrees F, broiling for the last 5 minutes.

Prep time – 45 minutes
Servings – 6

Nutritional Informatoin:
Calories – 250
Protein – 27g
Carbohydrates – 23g
fiber- 7g
sugar – 6g
Fat – 7g
SFA – 3g
MUFA – 2g
PUFA – 1g
omega-3 – 0.14g
omega-6 – 1.17g

This recipe is intended for post workout meals. Due to its level of carbohydrates, only eat this meal when you have earned it.

Enjoy!!!
~HD

January 31, 2010 at 7:41 pm Leave a comment

6 Tips for a Fitter 2010 (definitely not your same old diet advise)

I am an avid reader and follower of the Precision Nutrition Network. The precision nutrition program is proven scientifically, its simple and it can fit into any lifestlye. Through the precision nutrition method of eating everyone can win and get the results they are looking for … or shall I say everyone can loose!

Here are 6 Unconventional Tips that are a sure fire way to prepare yourself psycologically to get in best shape of your life in 2010.

Except taken from John Bernardi – 6 tips for a fitter 2010!

1. Do Less — People make change hard on themselves by attempting to change too many things at once. They try to overhaul their diet, their exercise habits, their finances, their relationships, etc., all at once — and each of those changes is probably made up of 10-20 smaller behaviors that have to change. That’s a big mistake. Accept the fact that you can only change one behavior at a time, and you will succeed. Try to change more than one thing at a time, and you will fail. It’s really that simple.

2. Focus on your Nutrition – exercise doesn’t work — Two recent studies have shown that exercise alone, isn’t all that effective for helping people lose fat, gain lean, and improve their body composition. I know it’s hard to believe. But it’s totally true. Of course, I’m not telling you this to convince you that exercise is no good. Rather, I’m trying to make a much more important point. And that point is this. Exercise ALONE isn’t very effective at promoting weight loss. However, when you combine a proper exercise program PLUS the right nutrition habits, the sky’s the limit.

3. Find a Social Support Network — Fortunately, leanness also can also be contagious. If you hang out with people who INSPIRE you, who LIFT YOU UP, inevitably you’ll find yourself inspiring others, and lifting up those around you. Really, if you don’t have a strong social support circle, people who can help you, people who inspire you, people you can lean on, then that’s one of the first things that needs to improve in 2010.

4. Give yourself and Incentive or Reward — Its a reward big enough to help you overcome the inertia that keeps most people from getting fit. In 2010, if you’re committing to getting in better shape than ever before, what’s your incentive going to be? Are you going to have a body transformation contest with your friends? With your work colleagues? Is money going to be on the line? A vacation somewhere special? It doesn’t matter what the incentive is. But there has to be one. And it has to be big enough to keep you focused when your motivation wanes. Which it always does, even if for just a little while.

5. Take a Risk — I learned a lot about this principle in a book called “The Blackmail Diet.” It this book, Dr John Bear mentions that experts can tell you what to do to lose weight. But all of this advice doesn’t amount to a hill of beans if you’re not forced to stay on the plan when the motivation wanes, when things get hard, when life gets in the way. Even famous fiction author Steven King writes about this principle in the context of quitting smoking. So, you’ve got your reward down. Now let’s pick your punishment. What uncomfortable thing are you gonna use to keep yourself motivated, to create pressure to succeed?

6. Do Something – Anything – Right Now — In fitness and in life. If you don’t do it now, it’s not likely you’ll ever do it. I know, I know, you like to “do your research”, read, learn, reason, and decide. But, the chinese have a great saying that tells you exactly where that gets you: one who deliberates fully before taking their first step will spend their entire life on one leg. And the Americans have a simpler one: just do it. I’ve found that those who just do it, need 3 things. First, they need a sense of importance. At some deep level, you need to genuinely feel that changing your habits and your body is really important. Second, you need confidence. Not necessarily in yourself (although that helps). After all, almost everyone starting something new lacks confidence. No, you need confidence in your plan. You need to really believe that the plan you’re about to follow, will work. Third, you need a willingness to act. You see motivation comes and goes. And the trick is to strike when the iron is hot. To act decisively when the motivation is there. The key is to do something positive, anything, right now. To be decisive, and act in a way that brings you even an inch closer to your dream. If you can do it on your own, go for it. If you need help, get it. It doesn’t matter what it is. As long as it’s positive and you can do it in the next 5 minutes.

If you liked what you read above… you can check out the full article and videos from John Bernardi at 6 Important Tips for a Fitter 2010.

Now, JUST DO IT!

January 11, 2010 at 9:50 pm Leave a comment

Learn How to Vaccinate Yourself against Body Fat

This week I’ve shared with you two blog posts in which Dr
John Berardi talks about losing body weight (and body fat).

The first one talks about how important incentives are for
changing your body. And it goes on to incentivize you with
a whopping $40,000 in prize money.

Could The Chance To Win $10,000 Help You Get In Shape?

The second one shows you how to coerce yourself into
sticking to the plan, even when the motivation wanes.

Enter “the best kept secret in weight loss.”

Finally, today, I have one last post to share.

In this one, Dr Berardi talks about how you can actually
vaccinate yourself against body fat. Hint: it doesn’t
involve needles!

Learn how to vaccinate yourself against body fat

January 1, 2010 at 1:25 pm Leave a comment

Get Lean, Win $40,000 | Precision Nutrition

The other day I sent out an email link to a video of Dr John
Berardi talking about his two latest programs – Lean Eating
For Men and Lean Eating For Women.

Far and away, the most frequent questions had to do with his
$40,000 is prize money. $10,000 to the top female winner
and $10,000 to the top male winner. Plus, 5k to ea…ch of a
few runners up.

Click here to check out the blog post announcing this
amazing prize:

http://bit.ly/5JkmEK

Now, today, I want to share with you a post covering the
flip side of the 10K prize. In other words, if the prize is
the carrot, today’s video talks about the stick.

You see, Dr. Berardi’s a coaching expert. In fact, he’s
probably the most successful nutrition coach in the health
and fitness business.

And after speaking with him, I realized that there’s
something powerful to this idea.

You see, the biggest transformations – body transformations
or otherwise – are accomplished when people have big
incentives.

And I’d say 10 thousand bucks qualifies as a big incentive
all right. But big inspiring goals also need some potential punishment.
Or, some risk.

And in today’s video, Dr Berardi shows you how to coerce
yourself into sticking to the plan, even when the motivation
wanes.

Enter “the best kept secret in weight loss.”
http://bit.ly/7qLo49

So, if you’re REALLY interested in changing your body and
you’d like a little extra incentive for doing so, this is
definitely a program you need to check out.

Again, this message is time sensitive. From what I hear
there are A LOT of people clamoring to get in on the program.

So check out these posts below. I know you won’t be
disappointed.

Could The Chance To Win $10,000 Help You Get In Shape?
http://bit.ly/5JkmEK

The Best Kept Secret In Weight Loss
http://bit.ly/7qLo49

December 30, 2009 at 10:24 am Leave a comment

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